Exhibition Review

Review From Boston Underground:

The Futures: The Next Generation of Ceramic Trailblazers @ Vessels Gallery

 

Text Written By Rachel Parker

 

Vessels Gallery presents an eclectic symphony of style and form with its new show “The Futures: The Next Generation of Ceramic Trailblazers.” The overall effect is a diverse medley of sometimes intricate, sometimes conceptual and sometimes functional pieces filling the space to the brim. The show presents the work of mid-career and early career ceramic artists all connected to the Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts, which provides artists the space for a retreat, and the time to focus on their art. Springing from Watershed, the show is organized almost as an artistic genealogical tree. Each artist spiraling out and away from the very same community space. From the inventive playfulness of Seth Rainville, who curated the show, to the conceptual installation of Stephanie Rozene, there is something to please everyone in this treasure chest of art objects.

 

A highlight of the show, Rainville’s “Theater cups” can be found tucked away in the shelving which takes up one wall of the gallery space. Reminiscent of Joseph Cornell’s multi-medium ‘boxes’ the two cups, symbolic of Rainville’s style, have miniature theatrical stages recessed inside the cups with hand painted dramatic scenes. A theater show inside of a teacup, one shows a man in a boat on crashing waves with umbrellas falling from the sky and the word “ponder” below. His work is made even more playful with the use of words, presenting the scenes or elaborating on their theme, often like fables or fairy tales.

 

Diametrically opposed, Shawn Spangler’s works are masterpieces of form and color, with precise red lines highlighting the soft green curves of teapots and other functional forms. Also working with color but without the same clean precision, Jonathan Mess’s works stand like rock formations or reclaimed natural elements in high contrast to the surround ceramic work. His unique process was described to me in this way: he reuses or reclaims old and discarded pieces of pottery from the woods outside of Watershed, and puts the broken pieces inside of molds, and pours colored clay over them. The resulting multicolored forms seem to imitate the nature from which Mess reclaimed the broken pottery. There are also two large installations in the space as well, one is Stephanie Rozene’s “Corrosive Use of Money in Politics” a collection of embossed plates.

 

Since it is simply impossible to mention each artist in turn I’ll end with a list and suggest that each is different and interesting in their own way: Sam Chung, Bryan Hopkins, Elizabeth Kendall, Jonathan Mess, Dan Molyneux, Jill Oberman, Seth Rainville, Stephanie Rozene, Shawn Spangler. With prices ranging from a few hundred dollars to a few thousand the show is reasonably priced as well as playfully creative, I suggest it to anyone since there is something for everyone in this small gallery space. The show is on until the 18th of May.

 

GET THERE: Take the Red line – a short walk from Broadway Station

SEE IT: On view through May 18th

MORE INFO: http://vesselsgallery.com

Please visit the following link to http://bostonartunderground.com/the-futures-the-next-generation-of-ceramic-trailblazers-vessels-gallery/?fb_action_ids=10201646259458632&fb_action_types=og.likes&fb_source=aggregation&fb_aggregation_id=288381481237582 

The Futures Exhibition: Vessels Gallery, Boston

The Futures Exhibition: Vessels Gallery, Boston

 

NCECA Milwaukee March 2014

Stephanie A. Rozene – Reception Thursday March 20th 5-9pm 207 E. Buffalo St, The Marshall Building (Historic Third Ward) Milwaukee, WI

Timothy Cobb Fine Arts – Artist Statement

NCECA Postcard 2014

NCECA Postcard 2014

The Corrosive Use of Money in Politics – NCECA Milwaukee – Concurrent Independent Exhibition March 17-22, 2014

Rozene’s current body of work continues her investigation into tableware and American politics, and in particular how European tableware was used as currency during the second half of the 18th century by French Kings and Queens who wished to demonstrate their wealth and power to other developed nations.  Through the use of pattern, gold luster and imagery an ornamental language emerges which is not bound to time and place but reflects the interaction and transformation of cultures through migration, trade, conquest and spread of religions.

NCECA Postcard 2014

NCECA Postcard 2014

This is evidenced in several of the most extravagant sets of tableware created for Louis the XV and XVI and their various homes at Versailles, Louvre, and personal apartments in Paris. Additionally they had services of over 2,000 pieces delivered to the Empress of Austria, King Frederick V and Christian the III of Denmark as ways to disseminate objects of wealth and power across Europe and the East, seal marriage proposals and avoid war by gaining allies. This work builds off of Rozene’s previous installations 270: The Corrosive Use of Money in Politics (2012) a portion of which will be on display as a part of this exhibition and The Politics of Porcelain, (2011) which used porcelain tableware, and a boarder of porcelain forms recalling rococo plasterwork to create place settings. When hung on the wall they created three vertical tables. This act of hanging the china elevated its importance and status to that of a painting. The work sought to begin a conversation about the importance of china and its ability hold with it immense power.

The corrosive use of money in politics continues the investigation of French influences on American china and politics. Here, Rozene uses patterns, ornament, and form from the Louis XVI china service (1783-93) and the Catherine the Great china service (1783) made by the Sevres National Ceramic Manufactory, Paris, France, both of which are widely acknowledged in the field as the most extravagant services created by the manufactory, to communicate meaning and create a discussion that reflects on our own contemporary language and political sphere. By taking patterns and forms from two different china services Rozene alludes to the two main political parties in the US, their relationship to money, power, and role in last fall’s presidential election (270 electoral votes are needed to elect a president), the increase of congresses wealth from insider trading deals, and the glaring disparity between the wealthiest and poorest in our economy. Responding to an increasingly divided congress, which has resulted in the recent US government shutdown, the work seeks to communicate the ways in which politicians use rhetoric and policy making as reasons to side with their party over the good of the country, even when those decisions hurt the most poor and needy individuals. She illustrates these ideas by using lavish gold luster and slip patterning, images of the Great Seal of the United States, and references the color of the original French china, directly tying our current economy to similarities with pre-revolutionary France.

Through symbolism and history Rozene raises the question of money’s corrosive use in politics and how it affects the American people.

- Stephanie A. Rozene

Please visit Timothy Cobb Fine Arts Gallery for more information

The Corrosive Use of Money in Politics, installation detail, Tim Cobb Fine Arts Gallery, Milwaukee, WI

The Corrosive Use of Money in Politics, installation detail, Tim Cobb Fine Arts Gallery, Milwaukee, WI

The Corrosive Use of Money in Politics, installation, Tim Cobb Fine Arts Gallery, Milwaukee, WI

The Corrosive Use of Money in Politics, installation, Tim Cobb Fine Arts Gallery, Milwaukee, WI

The Corrosive Use of Money in Politics, installation, Tim Cobb Fine Arts Gallery, Milwaukee, WI

The Corrosive Use of Money in Politics, installation, Tim Cobb Fine Arts Gallery, Milwaukee, WI

 

Credit information:

This body of work supported by the Winifried D. Wandersee Scholar in Residence at Hartwick College, The Milne Family Fund and the Hartwick College Faculty Research Grant program. This project could not have been possible without the assistance of Hartwick College students Alexandra Forst ‘13, Elliot Henry ‘13 and Erica Cantwell ’14

 

THE FUTURES: The Next Generation of Ceramic Trailblazers

The Futures Exhibition: Vessels Gallery, Boston

The Futures Exhibition: Vessels Gallery, Boston

April 4th — May 18th, 2014
The Futures: The Next Generation of Ceramic Trailblazers

Vessels Gallery, Boston, MA

Sam Chung
Bryan Hopkins
Elizabeth Kendall
Jonathan Mess
Dan Molyneux
Jill Oberman
Seth Rainville
Stephanie Rozene
Shawn Spangler

Opening Reception with Several of the Artists

First Friday, April 4th, 6:00-8:30pm
Visit Vessels Gallery Website for more information.

450 Harrison Avenue #71, Boston, MA

Gallery Talks on April 5th
Seth Rainville: The Futures, 2:00pm
Stephanie Rozene: The Politics of Porcelain, 3:00pm

Link

The Clay Studio National, The Philadelphia Clay Studio

Harrison, Reed-Smith Galleries + Online

March 7 through March 30, 2014

Installation The Corrosive Use of Money in Politics

Installation The Corrosive Use of Money in Politics

One of the many things that awaited me when I stepped into the Curator role at The Clay Studio was a juried national exhibition that was planned as a part of our 40th Anniversary. I was equally overjoyed and nervous. What kind of work would people submit? Would that work reflect the exciting ways that artists currently use (and abuse) clay? I typed up some thoughts, and the team at The Clay Studio released this call:

To celebrate its 40th Anniversary in 2014, The Clay Studio will present a juried national exhibition exploring the diversity within contemporary ceramics. Over the past 40 years, The Clay Studio has served as a launching pad for a vast array of makers. Your participation in this exhibition will help us launch the next 40 years.

The exhibition will be juried by Garth Johnson, The Clay Studio’s new Curator of Artistic Programs. “My personal tastes tend to lean toward…. the extreme and the exotic, but that’s only a part of my mission,” says Garth. “As a Curator, NCECA board member, and member of the clay community, I’m constantly working to ensure that the clay world retains as much diversity as possible.”

Send us functional pots, figurative sculpture, process-based art, digital clay… or even videos of performance-based work. Whether your references are historical, functional, alchemical or pure science fiction, show us what you’ve got!

In the end, I needn’t have worried—about the volume of submissions or the quality of those submissions. 316 artists submitted more than 700 pieces to the show. I could have put together at least a half-dozen knockout shows with different themes from the pieces that were submitted.  In the end, I had to edit the accepted pieces down to 40, leaving out some living legends, popular mid-career artists and talented up-and-comers.

The Clay Studio National does, in fact, contain figuration, process, performance, alchemy, and maybe even a dab of science fiction. Once the work was installed in our galleries, I was kind of surprised by how the show looked and felt. Even though there are some very earthy, elemental pieces to ground it, the show as a whole is a little bit pink, fluffy, goopy, colorful and funny. I’ll own up to a weakness for color and humor, but I was still a bit puzzled by the overall lightness (in tone, not importance) of the show.

I think I literally slapped my forehead when I realized what was going on. It’s been a long, cold snowy winter in Philadelphia—one of the snowiest on record. This show, with all of its color and lightness is a ray of March sunshine in our white cube of a gallery. The Clay Studio National that I put together is a tribute to the vitality that the artists bring to the act of making things with clay.

Plenty of delights and surprises await you in this exhibition. The thaw begins here.

Garth Johnson
March 2014

Exhibition Catalog Available

The exhibition catalog for Stephanie Rozene’s HELD HOSTAGE: THE CORROSIVE USE OF MONEY IN POLITICS has just been published through Blurb. This exhibition ran October 10 – November 12, 2013 at Evans Contemporary and featured Rozene’s continued investigation of French influences on American china and politics. Responding to an increasingly divided congress, the work seeks to communicate the ways in which politicians use rhetoric and policy making as reasons to side with their party over the good of the country, even when those decisions hurt the most poor and needy individuals. Through symbolism and history Rozene raises the question of money’s corrosive use in politics and how it affects the American people.

Softcover
80 pages
7″ x 7″
$24.99 + tax and shipping

Available through the gallery or online at Blurb.

http://www.blurb.com/b/5129242-stephanie-rozene-held-hostage-the-corrosive-use-of

Photo: Exhibition catalogue for Stephanie Rozene's HELD HOSTAGE: THE CORROSIVE USE OF MONEY IN POLITICS has just been published through Blurb. This exhibition ran October 10 - November 12, 2013 at Evans Contemporary and featured Rozene's continued investigation of French influences on American china and politics. Responding to an increasingly divided congress, the work seeks to communicate the ways in which politicians use rhetoric and policy making as reasons to side with their party over the good of the country, even when those decisions hurt the most poor and needy individuals. Through symbolism and history Rozene raises the question of money’s corrosive use in politics and how it affects the American people. </p>
<p> Softcover<br />
 80 pages<br />
 7" x 7"<br />
 $24.99 + tax and shipping</p>
<p> Available through the gallery or online at Blurb.</p>
<p>http://www.blurb.com/b/5129242-stephanie-rozene-held-hostage-the-corrosive-use-of

NEWS AND EVENTS

FALL UPDATES

An Item of Rozene's Recent Work

Hartwick’s Rozene Included in Several Noteworthy Exhibits

October 17, 2013

Hartwick College Assistant Professor of Art Stephanie Rozene is scheduled to participate in several prestigious art exhibits this fall. The events, which will last into the beginning of 2014, will be held across the United States and Canada.

Soonest is a solo show at The Evans Contemporary Gallery in Peterborough, Ontario, Canada. The exhibition, titled “Held Hostage: The Corrosive Use of Money in Politics,” will run from October 10 through November 11, 2013. The pieces Rozene will have on display for this show continue the investigation of French influences on American china and politics. According to the Gallery’s website “Rozene uses patterns, ornament, and form from the Louis XVI china service (1783-93) and the Catherine the Great china service (1783) made by the Sevres National Ceramic Manufactory, Paris, France, both of which are widely acknowledged in the field as the most extravagant services created by the manufactory, to communicate meaning and create a discussion that reflects on our own contemporary language and political sphere.”

This body of work involved the assistance of Hartwick College students Alexandra Forst ’13, Elliot Henry ’13, and Erica Cantwell ’14 and is supported by the Winifred D. Wandersee Scholar in Residence at Hartwick College, The Milne Family Fund and the Hartwick College Faculty Research Grant program.

Another project which Rozene has been invited to participate in is titled “The Dinnerware Museum: Three Courses” which opens in Ann Arbor, MI in December, 2013. Curated by Museum Founder and Director Margaret Carney Ph.D., this exhibition will focus on the novelty and fun of luncheon sets which rest on the lap of the diner. One of the two sets that will be made for this exhibition will be collected into the permanent collection.

Larger exhibitions like the Ferrin Contemporary’s “Ceramic Top 40″ and SOFA Chicago are also on Rozene’s agenda.

The Ferrin Contemporary’s “Ceramic Top 40 consist of 20 artists under and 20 artists over the age of 40 working in ceramics. For this show, artists are invited or selected through a specific inspection of a group or jury. According to Leslie Ferrin, director of Ferrin Contemporary “… after reviewing 475 submissions, we selected the artists whose current works best met the criteria and invited several others who are clearly leading the field in new directions.”

According to an announcement released by The Ferrin Contemporary, “This exhibition will present the ‘It’ artists currently working in conceptual utilitarian and sculptural ceramics.  The show seeks to identify those working on the cutting edge of current processes, ideas and presentation concepts by both the up-and-coming generation of artists and established artists who are breaking new ground.”

The exhibition will take place at Red Star Studios, in their new home at Belger Crane Yard Studios in Kansas City, Missouri and will open on November 1 and continue on through January 25, 2014.

Rozene also participated in SOFA Chicago, which  hosted the exhibit “The Futures: Celebrating Craftsmanship, Creativity, and Commitment.” SOFA Chicago’s webpage explains that, “For the past twenty-five years Watershed Center for Ceramic Arts has inspired ceramic artists to engage in a unique residency program where students, hobbyists, and professionals of all levels work together as peers in an inspiring environment. The artists selected for this exhibition have claimed their spot as leaders in the future of the organization and of the broader world of Ceramic Art.”

For additional information, contact Rozene at 607-431-4833 or at rozenes@hartwick.edu.

Why Art? Why Now? An article on the future of the arts

Rozene, Stephanie, Why Art? Why Now? The Wick Fall 2012 Hartwick College, Oneonta, NY

I wrote the above article this past fall and it was recently published in the Fall 2012 edition of Hartwick College’s quarterly magazine, The Wick. The article responds to several questions regarding the future of the arts and how it fits into our contemporary, political and college landscape.

What is the purpose or role of the arts in our contemporary landscape? It’s a complex question further complicated by societal, cultural, political, economic, and historical concerns. how do we, in a society that so highly values technology, design, and innovation, measure the value of art and art making?

I hope you enjoy the article.

Exhibition Annoucement: Everson Museum Biennial

ONEONTA, NY – Stephanie Rozene, assistant professor of art at Hartwick College, will soon be included in a community-wide, multi-venue biennial exhibition to be held at the Everson Museum in Syracuse, NY. The project aims to highlight the rich talent of artists across Upstate New York, with a special focus on Central New York and the surrounding counties.

The exhibition, titled: “The Other New York (TONY): 2012” is scheduled to open on September 22, 2012. Running from September, 2012 through early January, 2013, the exhibit will include a work from Rozene entitled: 270: The Corrosive Use of Money in Politics. Rozene’s installation, however, will be on display within the museum for the entire year, per the request of Museum Director Steven Kern.

This project, comprised of 270 plates mounted on the wall, continues Rozene’s investigation into tableware and American politics, and in particular how European tableware was used as currency during the second half of the 18th century by French Kings and Queens who wished to demonstrate their wealth and power to other developed nations.

This work builds off of Rozene’s previous installation, The Politics of Porcelain, (2011) which used porcelain tableware, and a border of porcelain forms recalling rococo plasterwork to create place settings. When hung on the wall, they created three vertical tables. This act of hanging the china elevated its importance and status to that of a painting. The work sought to begin a conversation about the importance of china and its ability hold with it immense power.

270: The Corrosive Use of Money in Politics continues the investigation of French influences on American china and politics. By taking patterns and forms from two different china services, Rozene alludes to the two main political parties in the US, their relationship to money, power, and role in the upcoming presidential election (270 electoral votes are needed to elect a president), the increase of Congress’ wealth from insider trading deals, and the glaring disparity between the wealthiest and poorest in our economy. Through symbolism and history, Rozene raises the question of money’s influence in politics and how it affects the American people.

This body of work was supported by the Winifred D. Wandersee Scholar in Residence Award at Hartwick College, The Milne Family Fund and the Hartwick College Faculty Research Grant program. Assisting Rozene throughout the course of this project were Hartwick College students Alexandra Forst ‘13, Elliot Henry ‘13 and Samantha McFarland ‘12.

In addition to the display, there will be an alumni reception hosted by Hartwick at the Everson Museum in Syracuse, NY, on November 20, 2012 beginning at 6:30 p.m. At the reception, Rozene will give a gallery talk and will speak about her installation.

For more details on “The Other New York (TONY): 2012” and the Everson Museum, visit http://www.everson.org/ exhibitions/details.php?id=600 .

For additional information on the upcoming Alumni Reception at the Museum, contact Director of Alumni Engagement Duncan McDonald at 607-431-4032 or at mcdonaldd@hartwick.edu.

For additional information on the installation at the Museum, contact Rozene at 607-431-4833 or at rozenes@hartwick.edu.

Getting the Edge on Artist Statements: NCECA Seattle

NCECA 2012, 46th ANNUAL CONFERENCE

March 28 – March 31 : Seattle, Washington
Washington State Convention Center
800 Convention Place
Seattle, WA 98101

Topical Discussion: THURSDAY, March 29th    (4:30 – 5:30pm) Room 6B

Artist Statement Workshop

Getting the Edge on Artist Statements: Stephanie Rozene

An artist statement offers insight into a single piece or an entire body of work by describing the artist’s creative process, philosophy, vision, and passion. Participants are encouraged to bring something to write with as we engage in short exercises to help, generate and hone our artist statements. All are welcome.

Rozene to exhibit at the Everson Museum Fall 2012

Rozene’s installation titled 270: The corrosive use of money in politics will be on display through November 2013. Below are a few sneak preview shots of the 270 plates that will be on display in this exhibition.

Rozene’s current research continues to investigate European influences on American china and politics. She is using patterns, ornament and form from the Louis XVI China Service (1783-93) and the Catherine the Great China Services (1783) made by the Sevres National Ceramic Manufactory, Paris, France, both of which are widely acknowledged as the most extravagant services created by the manufactory, to communicate meaning and create a discussion reflecting on our own contemporary language and political sphere. This body of work supported by the Winefried D. Wandersee Scholar in Residence and The Milne Family Fund as a part of Hartwick College Faculty Research Grant will be on display in the Everson Museum’s Biennial TONY: 2012 which opens in Syracuse on September 21, 2012 and be on display through next year’s presidential election in November. The work comprising of 270 plates hung on the wall is titled 270: The corrosive use of money in Politics.

THE OTHER NEW YORK: 2012

The Other New York: 2012 is a community-wide, multi-venue biennial exhibition that is the result of a major collaboration among twelve art organizations in Syracuse. This ambitious project aims to highlight the rich talent of artists across Upstate New York, with a special focus on Central New York and the surrounding counties. The project will offer diverse arts venues and outdoor public spaces for contemporary creative expression on a scale not before seen in Syracuse. In addition, TONY: 2012 demonstrates the power of artistic partnerships to boost public awareness of the arts by presenting opportunities for the community to connect with exhibitions, programs, and events offered simultaneously throughout the city.

TONY: 2012 is organized by the Everson Museum of Art in collaboration with ArtRage—The Norton Putter Gallery, Community Folk Art Center, Erie Canal Museum, Light Work, Punto de Contacto/Point of Contact/, Red House Arts Center, Stone Quarry Hill Art Park, SUArt Galleries, Urban Video Project, The Warehouse Gallery, and the City of Syracuse. Alternative art spaces in the form of freight containers will provide temporary exhibition/installation sites. The containers will be strategically located in the city to link arts venues and encourage visitors to walk and experience art along the way.

History

The Other New York: 2012 has grown out of a long tradition of regional exhibitions organized by The Syracuse Museum of Fine Arts (now the Everson Museum of Art) as early as 1901. The first exhibition showcasing Central New York artists was held in the Onondaga Savings Bank located in downtown Syracuse where the Museum converted a leased space into a gallery. The SMFA continued to feature regional artists after it relocated to the second floor of the Syracuse Public Library in Columbus Circle and later the Mansion House on James Street. Not long after the Everson settled into the current I.M. Pei building in 1968, it carried on the Biennial tradition. Since 1974, the Biennial has evolved into a showcase for Central New York artists, offering a rich survey of the vibrant art scene that thrives in this region. In 2008, the Everson expanded the Biennial to include artists from all of New York State and devoted the entire Museum building to the exhibition. In 2010, the Biennial was reinvented as The Edge of Art: New York State Artists Series, four smaller, but tightly focused exhibitions scheduled throughout the year.

In the past few years the Everson has emerged as the cultural leader in the region, increasing its profile in the arts community which, as a result, has become energized, engaged, and eager for more artistic interaction. With this in mind, the Everson aims to transform the Biennial into a multi-venue, community-wide regional exhibition by collaborating with arts organizations in Syracuse to present The Other New York: 2012.

Please visit The Everson Museum’s website for more information at www.everson.org